Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Rincon Ain't No Place For SUKs.


Johnny McCann's wave got wrecked by a SUK (Stand Up Kook) donkey yesterday, so his bro Kyle Albers, vehemently anti-SUK, returned the favor. Kudos, Kyle!
January 10, 2012.
c 2012 Peathead Publishing
peathead.blogspot.com

20 comments:

  1. I'm not a SUP fan but the first guy never would get through the section!

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    1. Yes, he would have. The SUK created that huge section.

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  2. that section was totally makable. that guy on the sup is a donkey

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  3. kyle! kyle!!!!! KYLE!!!! HOORAYYYY!!!

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  4. Anyone know what board Kyle is riding? Looks buttery.

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  5. The most butterey imop. That would be a 7' Liddle "death board".
    a magic template.

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  6. Goes straight really well. Conducive for soul arching too.

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  7. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  8. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  9. I dont see the point in creating a blog, if you are only going to delete the comments you dont agree with. Seems like you are being a little sensitive; if you dont like it, then either dont blog, or make it a read only community.

    I have a friend who blogs surf, and someone called him out for blogging unknown breaks. He left their comment up and replied back with his rebuttal. I guess some of us have a thicker skin than others. Wear a wetsuit, you wont feel it as bad.

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    1. Interesting the double standard ! You feel it is OK and "funny" to "delete" someone from a wave because one does not like what the other rides. But it bothers you that someone deletes the comments that one also dos not like !??
      I have surfed many years ... all types of boards .. including (but not ONLY) Stand Up Boards ... AND SURFING IS WHAT YOU DO ON A WAVE ... NOT HOW YOU CATCH THEM !

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  10. I'm a big guy and got into surfing late. Like many, SUP made the process infinitely easier. I had a bad right should so swimming and trying to surf was not going to happen. However, after just paddling around on the sup and learning to catch waves away from a lineup I got a lot of experience in a short time reading waves and riding them, albeit not anything fancy, just down the line and some carving and minor cutbacks. Along the way my then 6yo son started coming w me. He'd bring the 8' soft top that I couldn't surf and I'd push him in. He was a natural. Next thing he's at surf camp all summer and now at 8.5yo he's a super talented grom!

    I had my shoulder fixed perfectly last year. This summer I started surfing on a longboard w one of our great local instructors. Catching waves is so much harder but it is very fulfilling to hand paddle in. The board is more responsive. It's a new challenge for me and best of all I can be in the lineup w my son and friends much more organically.

    Now I have both perspectives. And I can definitely say that I don't like being in a lineup w a sup around standing over me with a paddle and having him jumping on every wave.

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  11. I'm the poster above about SUPs. Got tired of typing on my iphone! Anyway, I wanted to follow up by encouraging all who just completely hate SUPs to see them in a larger context. The first "surfboards" weren't Channel Island 5'2", they were boats. Eventually the Hawaiians surfed big logs. And that prevailed for a long long time. Hundreds of years. Eventually boards got smaller on the high performance end, but not everyone is 150lbs.

    Longboards, and really big longboards, and SUPs allow bigger guys, older guys/gals, surfers with bad backs and shoulders to surf. Does that potentially make the lineup more crowded? Yes.

    I cringed watching this video, because as much as I love how SUP improved my life and health and fitness, I am against SUP at Rincon as much as you. I'm an intermediate SUP and this Fall there were some sneaky great days at Rincon and there was this SUP guy out and I was on my longboard (which is almost a SUP- it's 11'!). Anyway, it was just frustrating watching him catch a lot of waves because anyone could do it. And if just 10 SUPrs showed up there, there would be no waves for anyone else.

    So, while I encourage understanding and tolerance of SUPs, I just don't think they should be allowed at Rincon. I was just in Kauai and the Hawaiians have adopted SUP as "just another surfboard" there. But the waves are different. Rincon would be ruined by SUP and I do think it's important to make sure none are allowed there on any days from semi-decent up. In the cove in the summer, no problem.

    Hope this gives a realistic perspective from someone who loves both SUP and surfing, but is pretty much exclusively surfing because I "get it" now, and I am just so stoked to be in the lineup and catching waves when it's proper to do so. My primary feeling about SUP is that I like to do it when it's small, mushy, and nobody is there. It can be a LOT of fun. And Santa Barbara is one of the best places in the world to own one.

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  12. One more comment from the SUP/surf guy. If you are deleting posts by angry SUPers, don't. Just put some kind of warning that threats/insults/childish writing won't be tolerated. But I think a dialogue is important about SUP and rincon. I'd like to get it so SUPrs in SB understand and agree that Rincon is a sacred spot and should not be ridden on SUPs unless the waves are 2' or so.

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  13. As a SUPer, I rarely surf unless there is no-one within 100 yards, I stick to the edges of breaks and out of the way. That said, I mostly paddle distance and downwinders on the open ocean. So proners, stay near the beach and out of MY way!

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  14. It's the surfer, not the surfboard. I've had jerks drop in on me with SUPs when I'm on my longboard (or one of my short boards) and I've had the reverse happen when I'm on my SUP. When I'm out there, I respect the ocean and the people in/on it (whatever they ride). If I'm on my SUP and I see something coming outside, I'm happy to let someone else feel the stoke and I'll let 'em know it's coming. No big deal ...

    "Jerks" come in all sizes, flavors and on all types of boards ... until someone proves that they are one, share the waves ... and if turns out they are one, let 'em know ... I've seen more people either improve or paddle somewhere else if enough people give 'em stink eye for being rude or obnoxious

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  15. There's an SUP ad near the top of your page. Run out of surf spots to sell out to the magazines and guide books (over and over again)?

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  16. Haha.. too bad you all take your surfing waaay too seriously. Lighten up. Enjoy being outside. Go find other sports and hobbies so you're not so angry in the water. If someone wants to surf on a noodle - go ahead. These waves are made for EVERYONE. Not just egotistical, territorial, over-zealous pricks that have no other interests in life beyond surfing.

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